The Sweetening of America

A battle wages for your “sweet tooth“.

Big corn manufactures are spending tens of millions of dollars to re-brand high fructose corn syrup.

Sugar makers say the corn industry is making a desperate effort to salvage the product which consumers are increasingly avoiding.

“The most widely used kind of HFCS may have disruptive effects on metabolism, as the body doesn’t utilize fructose well. In fact, regular consumption of HFCS may contribute to obesity.”

The National Consumers League has sent a letter urging the FDA to reject the renaming petition and noted that the corn sweetener in question “has received much negative publicity over the last several years.”

“Questions have been raised concerning potential links to obesity and a variety of obesity-related health conditions including diabetes and heart disease,” the letter said.

“Some consumers are concerned about emerging science regarding nutrition and health effects of HFCS, while others simply want to avoid highly processed sweeteners in favor of more natural substances.”

All sugars should be consumed in moderation and are best consumed in the form of whole foods such as fruits with the skin intact.

An Increased Risk of Type II Diabetes Linked to Processed Meats

As if we needed more reasons to avoid meat; salmonella poisoning, e-coli, antibiotic resistant bacteria and HCG, to name a few, add a risk of type 2 diabetes to the list.

Type 2 diabetes is at epidemic levels in the U.S raising many questions about the American diet.

Critics aside, some serious evaluation is necessary.

Healthcare costs from treating diabetes alone is in the billions and growing.

No comprehensive national healthcare policy can exist without a comprehensive national food policy!

Read the whole article to learn more.

Type 2 diabetes is linked with obesity. It occurs when they body does not produce enough of the hormone insulin, or the cells do not use insulin properly. Insulin helps the body use glucose or blood sugar for energy. When blood sugar remains elevated with diabetes, complications such as heart disease, blindness, and nerve and kidney damage can occur.

In the study, participants who ate one 3.5-ounce serving of non-processed red meat a day, such as steak or hamburger, were almost 20% more likely to develop type 2 diabetes.

Those who ate half of this amount of processed meat, such as two slices of bacon or one hot dog, had a 51% increased risk for developing diabetes.

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