New Drug Shows Promise For Treating Alzheimer’s Disease

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A new drug developed by Eli Lilly shows promise in treating mild Alzheimer’s symptoms.

The drug has not yet received FDA approval, however, it has been showed to improve cognitive decline by 34%.

There are 5 million Americans with Alzheimer’s disease today and that number is expected to rise.

The Very Real Link Between Sugar And Alzheimer’s

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The connection between sugar and Alzheimer’s can not be disputed.

The New Scientist Magazine, September 3, 2012 issue explains the sugar-Alzheimer’s link as the condition by which our muscle, fat, and liver cells stop responding to insulin.

The cells no longer metabolize glucose properly thereby leading to insulin resistance or pre-diabetes.

This, then causes the pancreas to produce excess amounts of insulin even as excess glucose builds up in the blood causing insulin spikes which overwhelm the brain.

Insulin also regulates neurotransmitters such as acetylcholine, which are crucial for memory and learning and is also important for the function and growth of blood vessels, which supply oxygen and glucose to the brain.

There’s also research tying brain dysfunction directly to excess sugar consumption. In a 2012 study, UCLA scientists fed rats a heavy ration of fructose (which makes up roughly a half of both table sugar and high-fructose corn syrup) and noted both insulin resistance and impaired brain function within six weeks. Interestingly, they found both insulin function and brain performance to improve in the sugar-fed rats when they were also fed omega-3 fatty acids. In other words, another quirk of the American diet, deficiency in omega-3 fatty acids, seems to make us more vulnerable to the onslaught of sweets.

Another facet of our diets, lots of cheap added fats, may also trigger insulin problems and brain dysfunction. New Scientist flags yet another recent study, this one from University of Washington researchers, finding that rats fed a high-fat diet for a year lost their ability to regulate insulin, developed diabetes, and showed signs of brain deterioration.

Government subsidies of corn and sugar have made these commodities incredibly inexpensive for the food industry which puts sweeteners in almost everything we eat.

This, at the same time Alzheimer’s costs $200 billion a year in health care alone.

The U.S. government has declared a mandate to find a cure for Alzheimer’s by 2025.

Cheap sugar comes at a very high price, indeed.

Coconut Oil Shows Amazing Results In Treating Alzheimer’s Disease

Coconut oil is credited with a great deal of health benefits which range from promoting weight loss to fighting bacteria, fungus and viruses, however it is the promise of a treatment for Alzheimer’s and dementia that has made the news.

Find ways to get nature’s superfood into your diet for all of the many health benefits offered by coconut oil.

Berries Boost Memory

Berries may help your brain fight off forgetfulness.

Antioxidants help protect against free radicals that destroy cells.

Flavonoids in berries may be the boost your brain needs to maintain memory and cognitive function.

The latest target of interest is berries. A study of more than 16,000 women over age 70 suggests there is a connection between berries and memory problems. Specifically, women who ate the most berries per week were likely to have up to a 2.5-year advantage in terms of when they showed signs of memory decline.

The health benefits of berries come in a tasty package with no side affects.

By making a yummy food choice you do yourself a favor.

Ward Off Alzheimer’s With Housework?

Studies find that even mild activity is better than no activity when it comes to preventing Alzheimer’s.

For those whom may be too frail for swimming or gym activities it appears as though light housework and gardening can be effective ways to keep active and avoid the disease.

The study, which was published this week in the journal Neurology, included 716 dementia-free men and women in their 70s and 80s. Compared with the most active people, those with the lowest levels of overall physical activity had more than double the risk of going on to develop Alzheimer’s. Greater physical activity was also associated with a slower rate of aging-related memory and cognitive decline.

“This suggests that people in their 80s who can’t participate in formal exercise still get a benefit by leading a more active lifestyle,” says lead author Dr. Aron S. Buchman, associate professor of neurological sciences at Rush University Medical Center, in Chicago. “You don’t have to get a membership in the local YMCA. If you walk up some more steps, stand up and do the dishes more, you stand to benefit because it’s incremental and adds up over the course of a full day.”

The key is to keep moving!

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