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New Drug Shows Promise For Treating Alzheimer’s Disease

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A new drug developed by Eli Lilly shows promise in treating mild Alzheimer’s symptoms.

The drug has not yet received FDA approval, however, it has been showed to improve cognitive decline by 34%.

There are 5 million Americans with Alzheimer’s disease today and that number is expected to rise.

The Very Real Link Between Sugar And Alzheimer’s


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The connection between sugar and Alzheimer’s can not be disputed.

The New Scientist Magazine, September 3, 2012 issue explains the sugar-Alzheimer’s link as the condition by which our muscle, fat, and liver cells stop responding to insulin.

The cells no longer metabolize glucose properly thereby leading to insulin resistance or pre-diabetes.

This, then causes the pancreas to produce excess amounts of insulin even as excess glucose builds up in the blood causing insulin spikes which overwhelm the brain.

Insulin also regulates neurotransmitters such as acetylcholine, which are crucial for memory and learning and is also important for the function and growth of blood vessels, which supply oxygen and glucose to the brain.

There’s also research tying brain dysfunction directly to excess sugar consumption. In a 2012 study, UCLA scientists fed rats a heavy ration of fructose (which makes up roughly a half of both table sugar and high-fructose corn syrup) and noted both insulin resistance and impaired brain function within six weeks. Interestingly, they found both insulin function and brain performance to improve in the sugar-fed rats when they were also fed omega-3 fatty acids. In other words, another quirk of the American diet, deficiency in omega-3 fatty acids, seems to make us more vulnerable to the onslaught of sweets.

Another facet of our diets, lots of cheap added fats, may also trigger insulin problems and brain dysfunction. New Scientist flags yet another recent study, this one from University of Washington researchers, finding that rats fed a high-fat diet for a year lost their ability to regulate insulin, developed diabetes, and showed signs of brain deterioration.

Government subsidies of corn and sugar have made these commodities incredibly inexpensive for the food industry which puts sweeteners in almost everything we eat.

This, at the same time Alzheimer’s costs $200 billion a year in health care alone.

The U.S. government has declared a mandate to find a cure for Alzheimer’s by 2025.

Cheap sugar comes at a very high price, indeed.

Your Gait May Lead to Early Alzheimer’s Diagnosis

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Yet more evidence points to the importance of exercise, especially walking, to prevent Alzheimer’s and dementia.

Good Fats Benefit Your Brain

When it comes to our bodies we all know that the good fats are best.

But what about our brains?

The results published online May 18 in the journal Annals of Neurology has shown that the cognitive function of older women who ate monounsaturated fats was better than those who ate saturated and trans fats.

Compared with those women who ate the lowest amounts of saturated fats, women in the highest saturated-fat category showed worse overall cognition and memory over the four years of testing. Women who ate the most mono-unsaturated fats, which can be found in olive oil, had better patterns of cognitive scores over time. Trans fats weren’t associated with changes in cognition over time, the researchers reported.

With diseases such as Alzheimer’s and dementia on the rise, the benefits could be greater that simply better memories and improved cognition.

Preventive measures to stem the increase of debilitating brain illness could benefit millions.

Government Strategy Aggressive On Finding A Cure For Alzheimer’s

More than 5 million people in the United States are living with Alzheimer’s and the future doesn’t look promising.

Alzheimer’s statistics projected for 2050 show the grim reality that will be faced by many.

11 million additional people will have the condition in the United States.

115.4 million will have it worldwide, compared to the current figure of about 35.6 million.

$1.1 trillion will be spent in the U.S. on caregiving costs, compared with $200 billion this year.

The new strategy supports a $7.9 million dollar study on an insulin nasal spray treatment. Separately, researchers will work on the first-ever Alzheimer’s prevention trial in people with a genetic predisposition to develop the condition. The strategy also offers solutions for collaborating across federal and state agencies and for informing the public through a one-stop website, www.alzheimers.gov.

“The plan gives us a blueprint to build on our research efforts,” U.S. Secretary of Health and Human Services Kathleen Sebelius said Tuesday at the announcement of the government’s new plan. “These actions are the cornerstone of an ambitious and aggressive agenda.”

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