Keep Your Brain Active To Avoid Alzheimer’s ?

There is no causal relationship between mental exercise and decreasing the incidence of Alzheimer’s and dementia, however, using your brain does increase overall neural stimulation and growth.

Many studies do find that being mentally active is associated with a lower risk of Alzheimer’s disease. But the standard caveat applies: association does not prove cause and effect, and there is always the chance that the mentally active people who never got Alzheimer’s simply had healthier brains to begin with.

Even, so, researchers say, there is no harm in telling people to try to stay engaged.

Extended study and learning new things can help overall wellness by contributing to increased confidence, social activity and independence which greatly improves the lives of the elderly.

The Financial Toll Of Caring For Those With Alzheimer’s

Although no one wants to look at caring for an ill loved one as a burden, however, there is no denying the overwhelming financial cost involved.

Unpaid caregivers are a huge part of the economy which is growing every year with the increase in Alzheimer’s and dementia cases as baby boomers age.

There is an urgent need to address this national emergency.

Caring for a family member with the personality-draining disease can take a hefty financial and emotional toll. Nearly 15 million people fall into the role of unpaid caregiver for those sick with dementia, according to the Alzheimer’s Association. Add it all up, and it comes to about 17 billion hours of unpaid care valued at $202 billion in 2010 alone.

So to help with the staggering cost of care, the Obama Administration has included $26 million in the proposed 2013 budget. That money will go to education, outreach and support for families affected by the disease.

Low Blood Levels Of Omega-3 Linked to Smaller Brain Volume

Omega-3 fatty acids contribute greatly to brain health.

What does low brain volume mean?

Lower cerebral volume suggests less blood flow and potential vascular damage.

Your diet truly can help your cognition.

Try adding supplements to your diet and also including more fish like salmon and sardines to boost your stores of Omega-3.

People in the lowest one-quarter for omega-3 levels had significantly lower total cerebral brain volume than those in the highest one-quarter, even after adjusting for age, body mass index, smoking and other factors. They also performed significantly worse on tests of visual memory, executive function and abstract memory than those in the highest one-quarter. There was no significant association with white matter hyperintensity volume.

Curcumin to Fight Prostate Cancer and Dementia?

The popularity of using natural remedies to treat illness and disease is not only becoming more prevalent but more practical, as well.

The effects of Curcumin on prostate cancer and dementia shows promise as a treatment.

The lack of side effects and accessibility of natural treatments make them attractive to those who have little or no insurance and those who are extremely sensitive to pharmaceuticals.

The researchers found that curcumin blocked two genetic receptors necessary for prostate cancer advancement. These receptors have been shown is past studies to predict cancer incidence and rate of growth of existing tumors. They noted that the spice extract was “a potent inhibitor of both cell cycle and survival in prostate cancer cells.”

In a separate research body, scientists found that curcumin prolongs life and enhances activity of brain neurons, acting as a neuroprotective shield against Alzheimer’s disease advancement. The research team determined that curcumin acted to prevent the damaging accumulation of amyloid fibrils around the nerve synapse. Amyloid tangles are known to prevent normal electrical and chemical transmissions required to form memories and maintain cognition.

Prisons Facing the Challenge of Caring for an Aging Population

Dementia and Alzheimer’s among elderly inmates creates an interesting dynamic within the prison population.

Some of the most hardened criminals come to the aid of ailing inmates, helping them with the most intimate of care with compassion and patience.

Dementia in prison is an underreported but fast-growing phenomenon, one that many prisons are desperately unprepared to handle. It is an unforeseen consequence of get-tough-on-crime policies — long sentences that have created a large population of aging prisoners. About 10 percent of the 1.6 million inmates in America’s prisons are serving life sentences; another 11 percent are serving over 20 years.

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