When Losing Your Memory is Something To Worry About

Forgetfulness is a part of everyone’s life, but when should you worry that it may be the symptom of something worse?

Here are 5 signs that your forgetfulness may be a sign of something more serious.

Your memory problems frighten you.

You’ve changed how you work or play because of memory problems.

Friends or family point out mistakes and/or express concern.

You notice friends or family starting to cover for you.

You find it hard to make choices.

“For many people with early dementia, the nature of the memory problems frighten them or cause a strong emotional reaction,” Robbins says. The fear tends to stem from knowing in your gut that something’s “just not right.”

Other examples: You’re uneasy because you can’t explain how your car keys wound up in the refrigerator — and it’s the second or third time you’ve found them in an odd spot. Or you’re driving down the road and suddenly have no idea where you are or where you’re heading — and a few moments later, you realize you’re on the same old road to work.

Talk to your physician about your concerns and help him/her to create a baseline of your mental health to monitor any changes or reason for concern.

Forgetful at 45 Could Be the Norm

Scientist have discovered that memory loss and cognitive function start slipping earlier than once thought.

Maintaining and improving mental health should start early in life.

Living a healthy lifestyle and being active seems to be the best way to ward off mental decline.

Researchers haven’t conclusively proven that cognitive decline in middle age predicts Alzheimer’s or other dementias, but on balance the evidence suggests that small changes in midlife mental function can become magnified later in life, says Francine Grodstein, Sc.D., an epidemiologist and associate professor of medicine at Brigham and Women’s Hospital, in Boston.
“There is a lot of evidence that [people] with cognitive decline are at highest risk of later developing dementia, so it is likely that preventing or delaying cognitive decline today will help reduce risk of dementia tomorrow,” says Grodstein, who was not involved in the research but wrote an editorial accompanying the study.

Is It Aging, Alzheimer’s or B12 Deficiency?

Loved ones exhibiting the early signs of dementia may simply be lacking in a vital dietary nutrient.

The question you might need to ask is, “Old age or low B12?”

B12 is an essential vitamin with roles throughout the body. It is needed for the development and maintenance of a healthy nervous system, the production of DNA and formation of red blood cells.

A severe B12 deficiency results in anemia, which can be picked up by an ordinary blood test. But the less dramatic symptoms of a B12 deficiency may include muscle weakness, fatigue, shakiness, unsteady gait, incontinence, low blood pressure, depression and other mood disorders, and cognitive problems like poor memory.

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