Spread Of West Nile Virus Won’t Let Up Until October


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Outbreak of West Nile Virus is unusually high this year, however, in 2003, 9,862 cases were reported and 264 people died, according to the CDC’s records.

This year’s outbreak is far from that, however, with human cases reported in 44 states it is still cause for alarm.

Although the disease can be deadly, not everyone will develop serious, neuro-invasive illnesses.

Some will have such light symptoms that they may not know that they are infected at all.

The nationwide numbers were up from 1,590 cases and 65 deaths reported Aug. 28, said Dr. Lyle R. Petersen, director of the CDC’s division of vector-borne infectious diseases.
“We expect this increase to continue for the next several weeks, probably until October,” said Petersen, who added that he was infected with the virus himself a few years ago. Many cases have not yet been logged because of the lag in reporting time, he said.
More than half the cases — 54 percent — are the serious neuroinvasive variety, which can lead to encephalitis or meningitis. The vast majority of West Nile infections, some 80 percent, are so mild that people don’t know they’re infected. About 20 percent develop symptoms and about 1 percent may develop serious, neuro-invasive illnesses.

The disease is spread by infected mosquitos which breed in water.

Unusual weather patterns, light winter and a hot, wet summer have contributed to a rise in the mosquito population.

See you physician if you feel that you may have any symptoms.

Non-Alcoholic Wine Is Best For Health Benefits


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Wine definitely has health benefits.

Cardiovascular health, lowered blood sugar and healthy weight maintenance are all benefits of polyphenols and antioxidants in red wine, however, research has shown that without the alcohol the benefits are just as effective if not more so.

Although there have been many studies on the impact of moderate drinking on health, the findings have been mixed, with some studies showing a benefit and others suggesting none. The new study found that 3 ounces of gin a day had no impact on blood pressure, while consumption of regular red wine led to a small, but not statistically significant, improvement.
The new study suggests that if you’re going to have a drink, red wine would be the healthiest choice, said Dr. Kelly Anne Spratt, a heart disease prevention specialist and a clinical associate professor of medicine at the University of Pennsylvania.

How To Be Environmentally Friendly With 33 Easy Tips


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It’s the little things we do everyday that can add up to real change.

Using less, using smart and rethinking old habits can make a difference in your life and for the planet.

Environmentally friendly tips won’t just help the planet but can help you live a healthier life, as well.

Limiting your exposure to toxins, additives, factory farmed meats and dairy can whittle your waistline, improve your health and keep you in your budget.

Tip Number 1

Reuse it. Bring a reusable bag on your next shopping trip, and you’ve already helped out the planet. The U.S. alone uses about 100 billion new plastic bags each year, and (brace yourself) this massive production costs 12 million barrels of oil. Worldwide, only about 1% of plastic bags are recycled — which means that the rest end up in landfills, oceans or elsewhere in the environment. Why does it matter? Plastic bags don’t biodegrade, but light exposure can degrade them enough to release toxic polymer particles — most of which end up in the ocean. Approximately 1 million birds and 100,000 turtles and other sea animals die of starvation each year after ingesting after ingesting discarded plastics and other trash debris, which block their digestive tracts. And public agencies spend millions of dollars on litter clean-up each year. (In case you’re wondering, paper bags aren’t much better. Each year, 14 million trees are cut down to make paper shopping bags via a process that requires even more energy than the making of plastic bags.)

Read on for more.

Study Shows That Lung Cancer Is On The Rise Among Non-Smokers


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Women are at much higher risk for contracting lung cancer and for women who have never smoked the rate of developing lung cancer is on the rise.

The American Association for Cancer Research has found that lung cancer tumors in non-smokers are different than tumors in smokers and they are trying to determine why.

The World Health Organization, WHO, recently classified diesel fumes as carcinogenic.

This might explain the rise along with other environmental factors.

“Not only has there been an increase in the number of women and non-smokers contracting the disease, but there has also been an increase in the number of cases diagnosed in stage 4 of the illness,” lead researcher Dr. Chrystèle Locher said in a statement.
This change — 58 percent with stage 4 in 2010 compared with 43 percent in 2000 — might reflect new classifications of different stages of the disease, the researchers said. They also found big changes in the type of cancer being diagnosed. The rate of people developing adenocarcinoma, a form of non-small cell lung cancer, jumped from 35.8 percent to 53.5 percent over the decade.

Natural Cures For Back-To-School Ailments


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Going back to school can be stressful for parents and kids.

But there is often more than just nerves to deal with when heading back to classrooms where kids touch and share everything.

Picking up bugs along the way is often a simple fact of life.

Exposing kids to chemicals is not always the best way to deal with infections and infestations, however.

For problems like pink eye, lice and anxiety there are natural remedies that can ease the pain of infection without the side effects of medications.

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